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Our Inductees

2nd New Zealand Expeditionary Force rugby team

2nd New Zealand Expeditionary Force rugby team
Popularly known as the Kiwis, they became one of the most influential and significant teams in rugby history.

All Blacks, 1905

All Blacks, 1905
The Original All Blacks established the patterns for all to follow, showing that while the birth of rugby may have been in Britain, its real development was in New Zealand.

All Blacks, 1924

All Blacks, 1924
They were described, by 1905 hooker George Tyler no less, as the weakest team New Zealand had fielded.

All Blacks, 1987

All Blacks, 1987
It was fitting, given that New Zealand was one of the countries that pushed hardest for the introduction of the World Cup, that the first cup was won by the All Blacks.

Fred Allen

Fred Allen
Fred Allen had a distinguished career as a rugby player, including being All Black captain, but it was as a coach that he gained an unmatched status.

Maurice Brownlie

Maurice Brownlie
One of three brothers to play rugby for New Zealand, Brownlie is regarded as one of the greatest loose forwards the All Blacks have had.

Don Clarke

Don Clarke
Though his records have been broken, Don Clarke’s status as a supreme All Black fullback remains undimmed.

Bert Cooke

Bert Cooke
Even 50 years after his career, Cooke was still being described as one of the most instinctively brilliant backs seen in New Zealand, even by people who had never seen him play.

Tom Ellison

Tom Ellison
Tom Ellison was a remarkable figure in the early days of New Zealand rugby and one of the most enduringly influential the game has known.

Sean Fitzpatrick

Sean Fitzpatrick
Sean Fitzpatrick played more tests for the All Blacks than anyone else, captained them more than anyone else.

Grant Fox

Grant Fox was a prolific points scorer and astute tactician for Auckland and the All Blacks during the 80s when both were dominant.

Dave Gallaher

He was captain of the Original All Blacks in 1905 and a commanding figure in New Zealand rugby early in the 20th century.

Ron Jarden

Ron Jarden
Ron Jarden was one of the outstanding wings in New Zealand rugby and his scoring ratio – 145 tries in 134 first-class matches – is all the more noteworthy considering a lack of emphasis on back play during his era.

Michael Jones

Michael Jones
Michael Jones burst onto world rugby when he scored the opening try in the first World Cup in 1987 in his first game for New Zealand.

Ian Kirkpatrick

Ian Kirkpatrick was one of New Zealand rugby’s finest loose forwards and for a time held the record, for backs or forwards, for scoring tries in tests.

John Kirwan

John Kirwan
John Kirwan was one of the most devastating wing threequarters to play rugby for New Zealand; when in top form, he was an irresistible try-scorer as his 35 tries in 63 test matches indicates (plus another 32 tries in non-test matches).

Brian Lochore

One of the most respected people in New Zealand sport, Sir Brian Lochore was an All Black loose forward from 1963 to 1971 and one of New Zealand’s most successful captains from 1966 to 1970.

Jonah Lomu

Jonah Lomu
Jonah Lomu was a player beyond the normal measures of achievement in sport. They were for other people; Lomu was unique.

Colin Meads

Colin Meads
Regarded by many as the epitome of the hard, rugged New Zealand rugby forward, Colin Meads's international career lasted from 1957 until 1971 and he continued playing first-class rugby for another two years after that.

Graham Mourie

From the first, in the early to mid-70s when Graham Mourie was chosen for Wellington and the New Zealand Juniors, it was evident that he was an All Black captain in waiting.

George Nepia

George Nepia
Nepia was the 19-year-old sensation on the Invincible All Blacks’ tour of Britain and Canada in 1924-25.

Mark Nicholls

One of the most influential All Blacks of the 1920s and the most noted member of an extraordinarily successful Petone sporting family.

Bob Scott

Bob Scott
Bob Scott was described by rugby commentator Winston McCarthy as a footballing genius, and there would be few who would disagree.

Charlie Seeling

Charlie Seeling
"Bronco" Seeling was an outstanding forward in the Original All Blacks of 1905 and renowned for his tackling and his strength.

Wayne Shelford

Wayne Shelford
“Buck” Shelford captured the imagination of the New Zealand rugby public during his six years in the All Blacks, during which he played 48 times and was unbeaten as test captain between 1988 and 1990.

Kevin Skinner

Kevin Skinner
Skinner was one of the great All Black props of the 40s and early 50s but his fame almost entirely centres on his coming out of retirement in 1956 to bolster the New Zealand pack against South Africa in one of the most tumultuous series New Zealand has seen.

George Smith

A remarkably versatile sportsman, Smith had international success as an athlete, a rugby player and a league player.

Eric Tindill

There wasn’t much in sport that Eric Tindill didn’t or couldn’t do. Mostly a halfback but sometimes a first five-eighth, he played 17 times for the All Blacks between 1935 and 1938.

Kel Tremain

Kel Tremain
In the exclusive company of the All Blacks of the 60s, Kel Tremain was an exceptional player.

Billy Wallace

He was called Carbine after a champion stayer, and what an apt nickname it was.

Wilson Whineray

Wilson Whineray
Sir Wilson Whineray played 77 matches for New Zealand, including 32 tests, and is regarded as one of the most successful and inspirational captains the All Blacks have had.

Bryan Williams

Bryan Williams
Whatever else Bryan Williams achieved in rugby – and he achieved much – the blaze of publicity he gained as a 19-year-old on the All Blacks’ tour of South Africa in 1970 never quite left him.

Jeff Wilson

Jeff Wilson
As a youngster at school in Invercargill, Jeff Wilson was a wonder of his age on the sporting field, whether rugby, cricket or, so it seemed, anything else he tried.

Sporting Spotlight

Gary Anderson

(1967 - )

For years, New Zealand cyclists were highly competitive without breaking through at the highest level. And then along came Gary Anderson.
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