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Our Inductees

Anne Audain

Anne Audain
Anne Audain is a fighter.

Bill Baillie

Bill Baillie was one of a small group of New Zealand runners whose footsteps on the world’s tracks in the 1950s and 60s trailed clouds of glory.

Marise Chamberlain

Marise Chamberlain
Marise Chamberlain was undoubtedly an athlete ahead of her time.

Rod Dixon

Dixon was one of the most versatile athletes New Zealand has had, running at an elite level over such diverse distances as 1500 metres and the marathon, as well as cross-country.

Murray Halberg

Murray Halberg
Sir Murray Halberg is one of the outstanding figures in New Zealand sport.

Don Jowett

Don Jowett
Don Jowett became the only New Zealand track sprinter to win a gold medal at a major games when he won the 220 yards at the Empire Games in Vancouver in 1954.

Harry Kerr

Harry Kerr
He earned his niche in New Zealand sporting history by becoming the first New Zealander to win an Olympic medal.

Stan Lay

Stan Lay
His first sporting love was cricket and Lay played for Taranaki against the 1928 Australian and 1930 MCC teams.

Jack Lovelock

Lovelock was, in many ways, an athlete ahead of his time, bringing a more scientific and psychological approach to his sport than had hitherto been seen.

Arthur Lydiard

Arthur Lydiard
Arthur Lydiard was renowned as an innovative, trend-setting athletics coach, particularly of middle distance and distance runners.

Barry Magee

Barry Magee
For all Barry Magee's achievements both as an athlete and as a coach, one event stands out: an event that he did not win.

Cecil Matthews

Cecil Matthews
There could have been no greater praise for Matthews than to be dubbed “the Nurmi of the Empire” after the great Finn, Paavo Nurmi, who dominated middle and long-distance running in the 1920s.

Les Mills

Les Mills is one of the most durable and competitive field event athletes New Zealand has had, competing in four Olympic and four Commonwealth Games between 1958 and 1972.

Lorraine Moller

Lorraine Moller
When it comes to commitment to and passion for a sport, Lorraine Moller sets the standards.

New Zealand Men's Crosscountry, 1975

New Zealand Men
New Zealand's win in the world crosscountry championships in Morocco in 1975 was one of the greatest, if little-known, performances of New Zealand athletics.

Arthur Porritt

Arthur Porritt
Arthur Espie Porritt, first Baron of Wanganui and Hampstead, led a life of achievement as a sportsman, a sports administrator, a surgeon, a health administrator, a writer and as the first New Zealander to become governor-general.

Dick Quax

Dick Quax
From 1500 metres to the marathon, Dick Quax was one of the outstanding New Zealand and world athletes through the 70s.

Norman Read

Norman Read
For older New Zealanders, the lasting image of the Melbourne Olympics in 1956 is of the smiling face of Norman Read as he strode into the Melbourne Cricket Ground to win the 50km walk, one of two gold medals won by New Zealanders in Melbourne.

Allison Roe

Allison Roe
Allison Roe was many things to many people during her stunning athletics career, but she was best known in New Zealand and internationally for winning the famed Boston and New York Marathons in the same year, 1981.

Randolph Rose

Randolph Rose
Though he rarely competed internationally and never raced at Olympic or Empire Games, Randolph Rose could lay claim to being New Zealand’s best-known athlete in the 1920s.

Mike Ryan

Mike Ryan was a remarkable marathon runner and among the long list of internationally acclaimed marathoners from New Zealand, he is acknowledged as the most accomplished.

Billy Savidan

Billy Savidan
New Zealand had some great runners in the 20s and 30s — Lovelock pre-eminent, Randolph Rose, Cecil Matthews and Savidan.

Joe Scott

For more than a decade, Joe Scott was regarded as the finest competitive walker in the world – when the sport was popular and known as pedestrianism – and could lay claim to being New Zealand’s first world champion.

George Smith

A remarkably versatile sportsman, Smith had international success as an athlete, a rugby player and a league player.

Peter Snell

Peter Snell
Three-time Olympic champion and world record-holder, Snell is one of New Zealand’s greatest sports achievers, and some say the greatest.

Dick Tayler

Richard Tayler or Dick Tayler, whatever he was called he will forever be linked with the first day of competition at the Commonwealth Games in Christchurch in 1974.

John Walker

The first awareness most New Zealanders had of John Walker was at the Commonwealth Games in Christchurch in 1974 when he chased home Filbert Bayi of Tanzania in the 1500 metres, which Bayi won in world record time.

Roy Williams

Roy Williams had a distinguished athletics career of nearly 20 years, during which he won the national decathlon title 11 times between 1956 and 1970.

Yvette Williams

Yvette Williams
In the days when women had few events in track and field, Yvette Williams seemed to compete in them all.

Val Young

Val Young
If Yvette Williams can justifiably be labelled New Zealand’s best woman athlete, Val Young runs her a close second.

Sporting Spotlight

Susan Devoy

(1964 - )

The bald figures of achievement hardly do justice to Dame Susan Devoy: 11 years of international squash, world champion four times, British Open champion eight times, New Zealand Open champion eight times.
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