Inducted in 1997
Popularly known as the Kiwis, they became one of the most influential and significant teams in rugby history.
Sporting Category:
  • Rugby Union
Their contribution to rugby lore was twofold: they resuscitated international rugby after World War II and they played a brand of rugby that set new standards of innovation and entertainment, in much the same way as the 1905 Original All Blacks had. But the Kiwis were not All Blacks.

They were soldiers and they were selected after active service in North Africa and Italy and, in some cases, after lengthy spells in prisoner of war camps in Italy, Austria and Germany.

Charlie Saxton, the 1938 New Zealand halfback and the only All Black among them, was chosen as captain. But such was the quality of their play, 15 of the team of 29 later played for the All Blacks.

The Kiwis played 33 matches in Europe for 29 wins, two draws and two losses.

They scored 605 points and conceded just 185. They beat the full international sides of England, Wales and France and lost just one international, to Scotland.

It was no coincidence that another rugby team regarded as one of the greatest sides, the 1967 All Blacks, were managed by Saxton and coached by another Kiwi, Fred Allen.

Sporting Spotlight

Jean Stewart

(1930 - )

Jean Stewart, who married champion swimmer Lincoln Hurring, was the outstanding New Zealand woman swimmer of the early 1950s.
Our Sponsors
Top
New Zealand Sports Hall of Fame
Railway Station
Anzac Avenue
Dunedin 9016
Otago
New Zealand
Close menu

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with stylesheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so. The latest version of Firefox, Safari, Google Chrome or Internet Explorer will work best if you're after a new browser.