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Our Inductees

2nd New Zealand Expeditionary Force rugby team

2nd New Zealand Expeditionary Force rugby team
Popularly known as the Kiwis, they became one of the most influential and significant teams in rugby history.

All Blacks, 1905

All Blacks, 1905
The Original All Blacks established the patterns for all to follow, showing that while the birth of rugby may have been in Britain, its real development was in New Zealand.

All Blacks, 1924

All Blacks, 1924
They were described, by 1905 hooker George Tyler no less, as the weakest team New Zealand had fielded.

All Blacks, 1987

All Blacks, 1987
It was fitting, given that New Zealand was one of the countries that pushed hardest for the introduction of the World Cup, that the first cup was won by the All Blacks.

Fred Allen

Fred Allen
Fred Allen had a distinguished career as a rugby player, including being All Black captain, but it was as a coach that he gained an unmatched status.

Chris Amon

Chris Amon
Chris Amon was regarded as one of the best drivers never to win a world championship Formula One grand prix.

Gary Anderson

Gary Anderson
For years, New Zealand cyclists were highly competitive without breaking through at the highest level. And then along came Gary Anderson.

Hugh Anderson

During an international motorcycling career that spanned four decades, Hugh Anderson won four world championships and 19 national titles.

Richard Arnst

Richard Arnst
Dick Arnst was a well-known successful cyclist early this century but it was in his second sporting career, as a single sculler, that he became nationally and internationally known.

Anne Audain

Anne Audain
Anne Audain is a fighter.

Bill Baillie

Bill Baillie was one of a small group of New Zealand runners whose footsteps on the world’s tracks in the 1950s and 60s trailed clouds of glory.

Erin Baker

Erin Baker
When multi-sport was in its formative years in the 1980s, Erin Baker was without peer in gaining success over a variety of distances and disciplines to such an extent that her feats continue to stand the test of time.

Philippa Baker-Hogan and Brenda Lawson

Philippa Baker-Hogan and Brenda Lawson
Individually and together, Philippa Baker-Hogan and Brenda Lawson were world leaders in rowing in the early 1990s. Between them, they won 47 national premier titles and Baker-Hogan became the first female New Zealander to win a world title when she won the lightweight single sculls in 1991.

Albert Baskerville

Albert Baskerville
He founded rugby league in New Zealand and was one of the instigators of international league, organising the first tests in Australia, England and Wales.

Jean Batten

Jean Batten
One of the world’s celebrated aviation pioneers of the 1930s, Batten forsook a promising career as a concert pianist to find her glory in the sky.

Tom Baxter

Tom Baxter
During a seven-year international career, Baxter played a record 94 games for the Kiwis, including 29 tests, and was reckoned to be the most punishing centre in world league.

Peter Blake

Peter Blake
From the time in 1971 when Peter Blake won the line honours in the inaugural Cape Town to Rio de Janeiro race, a year hardly went by without him adding to his sailing honours board.

Ces Blazey

When Ces Blazey was one of the original inductees in 1990, his citation read: “If one word only was allowed to describe him, that word would be 'meticulous'."

Lofty Blomfield

Lofty Blomfield
When wrestling was at the height of its popularity from the 1930s through to the 1950s, Maynell Strathmore Blomfield was its high priest.

Chris Bouzaid

Chris Bouzaid
Chris Bouzaid was one of the yachtsmen who set the course for New Zealand to gain such international renown in ocean racing.

Godfrey Bowen

Godfrey Bowen not only confirmed sheep shearing as legitimate sport, he made it entertainment as well, taking his talents around New Zealand and around the world.

Barry Briggs

Barry Briggs
Think speedway and the names of Ronnie Moore, Barry Briggs and Ivan Mauger come automatically.

Bill Broughton

Bill  Broughton
Bill Broughton was a master jockey who set the standards to which others aspired.

Maurice Brownlie

Maurice Brownlie
One of three brothers to play rugby for New Zealand, Brownlie is regarded as one of the greatest loose forwards the All Blacks have had.

Marise Chamberlain

Marise Chamberlain
Marise Chamberlain was undoubtedly an athlete ahead of her time.

Malcolm Champion

One of New Zealand’s greatest swimmers, Champion was the first New Zealander to win an Olympic gold medal - though he won it in the name of Australasia, the combined team that took part in the 1908 and 1912 Olympics.

Bob Charles

Bob Charles
Sir Bob Charles was the first New Zealander to have won one of golf's majors "the British Open at Lytham and St Anne's in 1963" and for 40 years was the only left-hander to have won a major.

Don Clarke

Don Clarke
Though his records have been broken, Don Clarke’s status as a supreme All Black fullback remains undimmed.

Annelise Coberger

Annelise Coberger
In a sport in which New Zealanders, or southern hemisphere skiers generally, barely leave an imprint in the snow, she was for a time the best in the world.

Bert Cooke

Bert Cooke
Even 50 years after his career, Cooke was still being described as one of the most instinctively brilliant backs seen in New Zealand, even by people who had never seen him play.

Jack Cowie

Jack Cowie
Known as “The Bull”, Cowie was New Zealand’s first great test bowler and ranked with the world’s best.

Coxed Four, 1968

They were, according to coach Rusty Robertson, the funniest crew you ever saw when they first got together for training at Kerr’s Reach on the Avon in Christchurch.

Graeme Crosby

Graeme Crosby
Graeme Crosby had a love for speed that was manifested in a brief but spectacularly successful international motorcycling career.

Lance Cross

Lance Cross
Sir Lance Cross had a widely diverse sporting career, from basketball administrator and national coach to a seat on the most powerful body in world sport, the executive board of the International Olympic Committee.

Martin Crowe

Martin Crowe
New Zealand has produced some fine batsmen, among them Bert Sutcliffe, Martin Donnelly and Stewie Dempster, but knowledgeable judges rate Martin Crowe the best of them all.

Leonard Cuff

Leonard Cuff
The Mr Versatile of New Zealand sport in the late 19th century, he was directly responsible for New Zealand and Australia getting in on the ground floor of the Olympic Games (even though New Zealanders didn’t compete at a Games until 1908).

Stewie Dempster

To look for the quality of Stewie Dempster as a test batsman, it's only necessary to look at the alltime best averages.

Barrie Devenport

Barrie Devenport
The challenge, to be the first in recorded history, to swim Cook Strait was likened to other sporting challenges such as Roger Bannister’s first sub-four minute mile and Sir Edmund Hillary’s conquest of Everest.

Cecil Devine

Cecil Devine
One of the legendary coach drivers in New Zealand in the 19th century was a Tasmanian called Devine.

Susan Devoy

Susan Devoy
The bald figures of achievement hardly do justice to Dame Susan Devoy: 11 years of international squash, world champion four times, British Open champion eight times, New Zealand Open champion eight times.

Rod Dixon

Dixon was one of the most versatile athletes New Zealand has had, running at an elite level over such diverse distances as 1500 metres and the marathon, as well as cross-country.

Martin Donnelly

Martin Donnelly
He was said to have everything as a test batsman — style and grace, confidence and determination, success and modesty.

Sandra Edge

Sandra Edge
Sandra Edge's meritorious mark on New Zealand netball began in 1982 when she captained the national under 21 team at the age of 17.

Eight, 1971-72

Eight, 1971-72
The success of the New Zealand rowing eight at the Munich Olympics in 1972, the same eight that had won the European championship the year before, was one of those wins that seem to transcend sport.

Eight, 1982

Eight, 1982
New Zealand has had golden moments in world rowing and 1982 was one of them when the eight won the world title on the lake at Lucerne in Switzerland.

Jimmy Ellis

Jimmy Ellis
Ellis in a career that lasted from 1924 until 1961 set records that today’s jockeys struggle to match.

Tom Ellison

Tom Ellison
Tom Ellison was a remarkable figure in the early days of New Zealand rugby and one of the most enduringly influential the game has known.

Bruce Farr

Bruce Farr
Bruce Farr is New Zealand’s best-known yacht designer and could also lay claim to being the world’s best-known – or even the best.

Rita Fatialofa

Rita Fatialofa
Rita Fatialofa played netball and softball for New Zealand.

Ian Ferguson

Ian Ferguson
When Ian Ferguson first competed at an Olympic Games in 1976 and even again when he was one of the tiny team in Moscow in 1980, few would have seen him as one of New Zealand’s greatest sportsmen.

Sean Fitzpatrick

Sean Fitzpatrick
Sean Fitzpatrick played more tests for the All Blacks than anyone else, captained them more than anyone else.

Bob Fitzsimmons

Though born in England, Fitzsimmons learned his boxing in Timaru and was always regarded as a New Zealand boxer.

Grant Fox

Grant Fox was a prolific points scorer and astute tactician for Auckland and the All Blacks during the 80s when both were dominant.

Dave Gallaher

He was captain of the Original All Blacks in 1905 and a commanding figure in New Zealand rugby early in the 20th century.

Dave Gerrard

Dave Gerrard was a champion butterfly swimmer whose life has been inextricably linked with sport.

Philippa Gould

Philippa Gould
By the time she was 17, Philippa Gould’s swimming career was behind her but she’d already earned herself enduring fame in New Zealand sport.

Mark Graham

Mark Graham
Respected throughout the league world as a tough, skilful forward, Graham played 26 tests for New Zealand from 1977, when he was 21, until 1988.

Darcy Hadfield

Darcy Hadfield
The third of the single sculling elite New Zealand was able to boast before and after World War I, Hadfield could also claim an Olympic medal.

Richard Hadlee

Richard Hadlee
It was no coincidence that when Sir Richard Hadlee was making his mark on the cricket fields of the world, so was New Zealand; that the national team’s days in the sun were in large part because of his efforts.

Walter Hadlee

Walter Hadlee’s name is linked inextricably to New Zealand cricket for many reasons.

Murray Halberg

Murray Halberg
Sir Murray Halberg is one of the outstanding figures in New Zealand sport.

William Hamilton

William Hamilton
William Hamilton is famed throughout the world for being the man who first developed a jet engine for boats, but it was far from his only first.

Joan Harnett

Joan Harnett
Joan (now Harnett-Kindley) was one of the outstanding players who helped transform the image of “basketball” as a schoolgirls’ game to netball as a fast, entertaining international sport.

Tom Heeney

Tom Heeney
Heeney was a boxer who won an enduring fame not so much for what he did, but for what he attempted to do: win the world professional heavyweight championship.

Kevin Herlihy

Kevin Herlihy was such a dominant pitcher in New Zealand softball for nearly 20 years that he was once described as the Richard Hadlee of softball.

Stan Hill

Stan Hill
Stan Hill played basketball for New Zealand for 14 years, nine of them as captain, and was head and shoulders, sometimes literally, above other New Zealand basketballers.

Edmund Hillary

Sir Edmund Hillary was voted in the 1980s as “the greatest living New Zealander”, one of a lifetime of accolades that have been bestowed upon him.

Karen Holliday

The only New Zealander to win a full world cycling title.

Oliver Hollis

Oliver Hollis
Oliver Hollis was the outstanding New Zealand woman golfer in two distinct eras.

Maurice Holmes

Maurice Holmes
In a sporting career that spanned six decades, Morrie Holmes became the greatest driver in New Zealand harness racing that the sport has seen.

Denis Hulme

Denny Hulme lived to race, whether small sports cars or huge trucks and in the most competitive motorsport of all, the intensity of Formula One, he was New Zealand’s only world champion.

Gary Hurring

Gary Hurring
The Commonwealth Games 200 metres backstroke champion in 1978, Hurring was denied a chance to extend his success to the Olympic arena by swimming’s withdrawal for political reasons from the Games in Moscow in 1980.

Naomi James

Naomi James
Naomi James suffered from seasickness but she went to sea. She was a private person and disliked crowds, but she became a world celebrity, feted wherever she went.

Ron Jarden

Ron Jarden
Ron Jarden was one of the outstanding wings in New Zealand rugby and his scoring ratio – 145 tries in 134 first-class matches – is all the more noteworthy considering a lack of emphasis on back play during his era.

Stacey Jones

Stacey Jones
Stacey Jones used to be known as “The Little General” for good reasons: he was little among the big men of rugby league, but he was the general who dictated the strategy and the tactics for the teams he graced.

Stuart Jones

Stuart Jones
Stuart Jones is unquestionably one of the finest golfers produced by New Zealand, a name to stand alongside the greats of the game.

Linda Jones

Linda Jones
Through a combination of a love of horses and a stubborn streak that wouldn’t accept the word “no”, Linda Jones became a national celebrity in the 1970s.

Michael Jones

Michael Jones
Michael Jones burst onto world rugby when he scored the opening try in the first World Cup in 1987 in his first game for New Zealand.

Don Jowett

Don Jowett
Don Jowett became the only New Zealand track sprinter to win a gold medal at a major games when he won the 220 yards at the Empire Games in Vancouver in 1954.

Barbara Kendall

Barbara Kendall
Barbara Kendall began international competition when she was still a teenager and for the next 20 or so years, there was no one to compare.

Bruce Kendall

Bruce Kendall
Bruce Kendall not only achieved personal success at the pinnacle of his sport, he also showed and inspired others to follow in his wake

Harry Kerr

Harry Kerr
He earned his niche in New Zealand sporting history by becoming the first New Zealander to win an Olympic medal.

Ian Kirkpatrick

Ian Kirkpatrick was one of New Zealand rugby’s finest loose forwards and for a time held the record, for backs or forwards, for scoring tries in tests.

John Kirwan

John Kirwan
John Kirwan was one of the most devastating wing threequarters to play rugby for New Zealand; when in top form, he was an irresistible try-scorer as his 35 tries in 63 test matches indicates (plus another 32 tries in non-test matches).

Duncan Laing

Duncan Laing’s sporting exploits began in Taranaki where he was a strong and effective surf lifesaver – he captained the New Zealand team against Australia - and was a lock for the provincial rugby team.

Stan Lay

Stan Lay
His first sporting love was cricket and Lay played for Taranaki against the 1928 Australian and 1930 MCC teams.

Chris Lewis

Chris Lewis
For nine years, Chris Lewis was New Zealand’s leading tennis player and among many fine moments in his career, there was none finer than the magical fortnight in 1983 when he played his way through to the final at Wimbledon.

Danyon Loader

Danyon Loader
When the names of New Zealand's greatest Olympians are remembered, that of Danyon Loader is of the first rank.

Brian Lochore

One of the most respected people in New Zealand sport, Sir Brian Lochore was an All Black loose forward from 1963 to 1971 and one of New Zealand’s most successful captains from 1966 to 1970.

Jonah Lomu

Jonah Lomu
Jonah Lomu was a player beyond the normal measures of achievement in sport. They were for other people; Lomu was unique.

Jack Lovelock

Lovelock was, in many ways, an athlete ahead of his time, bringing a more scientific and psychological approach to his sport than had hitherto been seen.

Tom Lowry

Tom Lowry
Lowry was one of the dominant figures of New Zealand cricket in its formative test years.

Arthur Lydiard

Arthur Lydiard
Arthur Lydiard was renowned as an innovative, trend-setting athletics coach, particularly of middle distance and distance runners.

Paul MacDonald

Paul MacDonald
One of New Zealand’s most successful Olympians, MacDonald was a key figure in the small but effective New Zealand canoeing force of the 1980s.

Barry Magee

Barry Magee
For all Barry Magee's achievements both as an athlete and as a coach, one event stands out: an event that he did not win.

Peter Mander and Jack Cropp

The first time New Zealand sent yachtsmen to an Olympic Games they came home with a gold medal.

Marilyn Marshall

Marilyn Marshall had the distinction of captaining her country in two sports, softball and soccer.

Bill Massey

Bill Massey
Dubbed “The Man With the Golden Arm”, Massey was a dominant figure in national softball and it was largely through his expertise and efforts that the sport gained national attention.

Cecil Matthews

Cecil Matthews
There could have been no greater praise for Matthews than to be dubbed “the Nurmi of the Empire” after the great Finn, Paavo Nurmi, who dominated middle and long-distance running in the 1920s.

Ivan Mauger

In Ivan Mauger’s long list of achievements in speedway, one record stands supreme: he is the only rider to have won the world championship six times and he is the only rider to have won world titles in three successive years.

Winston McCarthy

Winston McCarthy was regarded as the voice of rugby during the 1950s when he was the main radio commentator for the state-run New Zealand Broadcasting Service.

Clark McConachy

Clark McConachy
McConachy had an extraordinary sporting career that was as long as an average lifetime and rarely has New Zealand produced a sportsman of such enduring excellence.

Jenny McDonald

For a time, it was difficult to imagine a New Zealand women’s hockey team without Jenny McDonald.

Meda McKenzie

She first made her mark on sport when she was 15 and swum Cook Strait. It was the first of many triumphs.

Bruce McLaren

Bruce McLaren
Bruce McLaren was a talented, innovative motor racing driver whose success was measured by four Formula One grand prix wins from 103 starts and perhaps more notably, by founding the most successful team in Formula One history.

Colin Meads

Colin Meads
Regarded by many as the epitome of the hard, rugged New Zealand rugby forward, Colin Meads's international career lasted from 1957 until 1971 and he continued playing first-class rugby for another two years after that.

Men's Hockey Team 1978

Men
When the New Zealand team left for the Montreal Olympics in 1976, the hockey team was seldom mentioned as possible medalists.

Les Mills

Les Mills is one of the most durable and competitive field event athletes New Zealand has had, competing in four Olympic and four Commonwealth Games between 1958 and 1972.

Lorraine Moller

Lorraine Moller
When it comes to commitment to and passion for a sport, Lorraine Moller sets the standards.

Ronnie Moore

Ronnie Moore
Ronnie Moore partnered his father Les in speedway riding in Christchurch as a 10-year-old, including the spectacular “Wall of Death” which entailed riding on an almost perpendicular track.

Ted Morgan

Ted Morgan
Morgan became the first New Zealander to win an Olympic gold medal while competing for New Zealand.

Anthony Mosse

Anthony Mosse
Anthony Mosse was the standardbearer for New Zealand swimming through the 1980s.

Dick Motz

Dick Motz
Motz, a big man in stature and reputation, was the first New Zealander to take 100 test wickets.

Ces Mountford

Ces Mountford
Ces Mountford achieved seemingly everything in a spectacular rugby league career as a player and coach except play for his country.

Graham Mourie

From the first, in the early to mid-70s when Graham Mourie was chosen for Wellington and the New Zealand Juniors, it was evident that he was an All Black captain in waiting.

Lois Muir

Lois Muir coached the national netball team for 15 years until 1988 and it was in that role that she became an inspiration for women in all sport, not just in netball.

Billy Murphy

Billy Murphy
His proper name was Thomas William Murphy but he was known more as “Torpedo Billy”, the only New Zealand-born boxer (he was born in Auckland) to hold a world boxing title.

George Nepia

George Nepia
Nepia was the 19-year-old sensation on the Invincible All Blacks’ tour of Britain and Canada in 1924-25.

Netball, 1967

Netball, 1967
Netball was still known as basketball when the New Zealand team set off for the second world championships, in Perth in 1967.

Netball, 1987

Netball, 1987
Many in the team had played in the previous world championships, in Singapore in 1983, in which they were beaten in the final by Australia, and vowed that the championships in Glasgow in 1987 would be vastly different.

New Zealand Men's Crosscountry, 1975

New Zealand Men
New Zealand's win in the world crosscountry championships in Morocco in 1975 was one of the greatest, if little-known, performances of New Zealand athletics.

Mark Nicholls

One of the most influential All Blacks of the 1920s and the most noted member of an extraordinarily successful Petone sporting family.

Ross Norman

Ross Norman
For more than five years and something like 550 matches, the legendary Pakistani squash player Jahangir Khan was not only unbeaten, he was seen to be that rarest of sporting breeds, unbeatable. And then along came a tall New Zealander, Ross Norman.

Kathleen Nunneley

Kathleen Nunneley
Kathleen Nunneley was far and away the best woman tennis player in New Zealand in the late 1890s and early 1900s and though the game has changed out of sight, could still lay claim to being the best New Zealand has had.

Lance O’Sullivan

Lance O’Sullivan
Lance O’Sullivan is supreme among jockeys who have etched their names in the long and illustrious history of thoroughbred racing in New Zealand.

Don Oliver

Don Oliver was a weightlifter of prodigious strength and competitive endurance, and also a highly popular figure, as evidenced by his captaincy of New Zealand teams at the Commonwealth Games in 1966 and the Mexico Olympics in 1968.

Onny Parun

Onny Parun
It’s not too often that modern sports people admit to answering the call of Queen and country first, but that’s what Onny Parun did in 1975 when he chose to play for New Zealand in a Davis Cup tie instead of playing in a tournament in Holland.

Helmer Pedersen and Earle Wells

When Earle Wells sought a skipper in 1961 for his Flying Dutchman class yacht, Pandora, and settled on a Danish émigré, Helmer Pedersen, an Olympic champion combination was born.

Rebecca Perrott

Rebecca Perrott was a champion swimmer, ranked with the best in the world, and has the unusual distinction of being the catalyst for the formation of the New Zealand Sports Foundation, the principal sports funding body.

Arthur Porritt

Arthur Porritt
Arthur Espie Porritt, first Baron of Wanganui and Hampstead, led a life of achievement as a sportsman, a sports administrator, a surgeon, a health administrator, a writer and as the first New Zealander to become governor-general.

Dick Quax

Dick Quax
From 1500 metres to the marathon, Dick Quax was one of the outstanding New Zealand and world athletes through the 70s.

Norman Read

Norman Read
For older New Zealanders, the lasting image of the Melbourne Olympics in 1956 is of the smiling face of Norman Read as he strode into the Melbourne Cricket Ground to win the 50km walk, one of two gold medals won by New Zealanders in Melbourne.

Daniel Reese

Regarded as the father of cricket in New Zealand, he was the first truly international cricketer to be produced by New Zealand.

John Reid

A batsman, a bowler and sometimes a wicketkeeper, Reid could lay claim with Sir Richard Hadlee to being New Zealand cricket’s greatest allrounder.

Eve Rimmer

Eve Rimmer
Eve Rimmer had been a school long jump recordholder and sprint champion before a car crash at the age of 15 left her a paraplegic.

Rusty Robertson

In word association tests, people could think of a sport and think automatically of a coach, as if the two were one and the same.

Jeff Robson

It seemed that if there was a racket sport, Jeff Robson could be expert at it.

Allison Roe

Allison Roe
Allison Roe was many things to many people during her stunning athletics career, but she was best known in New Zealand and internationally for winning the famed Boston and New York Marathons in the same year, 1981.

Randolph Rose

Randolph Rose
Though he rarely competed internationally and never raced at Olympic or Empire Games, Randolph Rose could lay claim to being New Zealand’s best-known athlete in the 1920s.

Sir Donald Rowlands

Sir Donald Rowlands
Don Rowlands had at least two careers in the sport he graced: one as a top-level competitor and the other as an administrator and organiser without peer.

Wynton Rufer

When the great soccer players of New Zealand are being discussed, one name unanimously is thrust to the fore.

Lesley Rumball

Lesley Rumball
Lesley Rumball, or Lesley Nicol as she was for much of her glittering career, played top-level netball for more than a decade and she was the first to play a hundred games for New Zealand.

Philip Rush

Regarded as too slow to be a competitive pool swimmer, Rush turned to endurance swimming and became one of the best there has been.

Mike Ryan

Mike Ryan was a remarkable marathon runner and among the long list of internationally acclaimed marathoners from New Zealand, he is acknowledged as the most accomplished.

Billy Savidan

Billy Savidan
New Zealand had some great runners in the 20s and 30s — Lovelock pre-eminent, Randolph Rose, Cecil Matthews and Savidan.

Bob Scott

Bob Scott
Bob Scott was described by rugby commentator Winston McCarthy as a footballing genius, and there would be few who would disagree.

Joe Scott

For more than a decade, Joe Scott was regarded as the finest competitive walker in the world – when the sport was popular and known as pedestrianism – and could lay claim to being New Zealand’s first world champion.

Charlie Seeling

Charlie Seeling
"Bronco" Seeling was an outstanding forward in the Original All Blacks of 1905 and renowned for his tackling and his strength.

Wayne Shelford

Wayne Shelford
“Buck” Shelford captured the imagination of the New Zealand rugby public during his six years in the All Blacks, during which he played 48 times and was unbeaten as test captain between 1988 and 1990.

Ned Shewry

Ned Shewry
In the days when woodchopping was a highly popular competitive sport, Ned Shewry was one of the most sought-after of athletes.

Bob Skelton

Bob Skelton
During a career crammed with honours, Bob Skelton rode 2129 winners. His first two-mile winner was Lancaster in the 1954 Great Autumn Handicap and 30 years later, he was still among the leading jockeys.

Bill Skelton

The names of the Skelton brothers Bob and Bill are synonymous with horseracing in New Zealand.

Kevin Skinner

Kevin Skinner
Skinner was one of the great All Black props of the 40s and early 50s but his fame almost entirely centres on his coming out of retirement in 1956 to bolster the New Zealand pack against South Africa in one of the most tumultuous series New Zealand has seen.

Phil Skoglund

Phil Skoglund
One of New Zealand’s alltime greatest lawn bowlers, Skoglund might have been bred to bowl.

George Smith

A remarkably versatile sportsman, Smith had international success as an athlete, a rugby player and a league player.

Ian Smith

Ian Smith
Ian Smith, known to his teammates as “Stockley” after one of his given names, was one of the key contributors in a New Zealand cricket golden era in the 1980s.

Peter Snell

Peter Snell
Three-time Olympic champion and world record-holder, Snell is one of New Zealand’s greatest sports achievers, and some say the greatest.

Softball Women, 1982

Softball Women, 1982
The New Zealand women’s softball team won the International Softball Federation’s fifth world championships in Taiwan in 1982.

Mark Sorenson

Mark Sorenson
Mark Sorenson first played for New Zealand when he was sixteen and continued for more than twenty years, collecting honour after honour along the way.

Jean Stewart

Jean Stewart
Jean Stewart, who married champion swimmer Lincoln Hurring, was the outstanding New Zealand woman swimmer of the early 1950s.

Bert Sutcliffe

Bert Sutcliffe
Bert Sutcliffe was regarded, with the Australian Neil Harvey, as the best left-handed batsman of his generation.

Waimarama Taumaunu

Waimarama Taumaunu
“Wai”, as she is universally known, was only in her mid-teens when she entered representative netball for Canterbury and by 1981, she was in the national team.

Dick Tayler

Richard Tayler or Dick Tayler, whatever he was called he will forever be linked with the first day of competition at the Commonwealth Games in Christchurch in 1974.

Alan Thompson

Alan Thompson
Alan Thompson was one of the small band of canoeists who rewrote New Zealand Olympic history in the 1980s.

Eric Tindill

There wasn’t much in sport that Eric Tindill didn’t or couldn’t do. Mostly a halfback but sometimes a first five-eighth, he played 17 times for the All Blacks between 1935 and 1938.

Mark Todd

Among the champion equestrian riders produced by New Zealand, the name of Mark Todd stands supreme.

Kel Tremain

Kel Tremain
In the exclusive company of the All Blacks of the 60s, Kel Tremain was an exceptional player.

Glenn Turner

Glenn Turner
In the West Indies in 1972, Glenn Turner was such a prolific scorer (two successive innings of 259 in Georgetown), the crowds dubbed him “Mistah Runs”.

Sarah Ulmer

In her time, no one in the world was faster or better at the demanding individual pursuit than Sarah Ulmer.

Rob Waddell

Rob Waddell
For three years, Rob Waddell was practically invincible in the single sculls.

John Walker

The first awareness most New Zealanders had of John Walker was at the Commonwealth Games in Christchurch in 1974 when he chased home Filbert Bayi of Tanzania in the 1500 metres, which Bayi won in world record time.

Billy Wallace

He was called Carbine after a champion stayer, and what an apt nickname it was.

Billy Webb

Billy Webb
Webb was the first of a long line of great New Zealand oarsmen.

Wilson Whineray

Wilson Whineray
Sir Wilson Whineray played 77 matches for New Zealand, including 32 tests, and is regarded as one of the most successful and inspirational captains the All Blacks have had.

Des White

In a six-year international career, Des White became the most prolific points-scorer in New Zealand league.

Ruben Wiki

Ruben Wiki
Ruben Wiki’s career in rugby league was one of enduring success and excellence, beginning with the Canberra Raiders in 1993 and ending with the New Zealand Warriors fifteen years later.

Anthony Wilding

Anthony Wilding
Even from a different, gentler era, Wilding without dispute remains New Zealand’s greatest tennis player.

Elsie Wilkie

It can’t be the lot of many women in New Zealand sport who first become a world champion when they’re a grandmother.

Bryan Williams

Bryan Williams
Whatever else Bryan Williams achieved in rugby – and he achieved much – the blaze of publicity he gained as a 19-year-old on the All Blacks’ tour of South Africa in 1970 never quite left him.

Roy Williams

Roy Williams had a distinguished athletics career of nearly 20 years, during which he won the national decathlon title 11 times between 1956 and 1970.

Yvette Williams

Yvette Williams
In the days when women had few events in track and field, Yvette Williams seemed to compete in them all.

Jeff Wilson

Jeff Wilson
As a youngster at school in Invercargill, Jeff Wilson was a wonder of his age on the sporting field, whether rugby, cricket or, so it seemed, anything else he tried.

Cis Winstanley

Cis Winstanley took up bowls in 1946 to help her recover from surgery and she became New Zealand’s most successful woman bowler.

Peter Wolfenden

The name of Peter Wolfenden is inextricably linked to that of Cardigan Bay, the best pacer produced in New Zealand.

Val Young

Val Young
If Yvette Williams can justifiably be labelled New Zealand’s best woman athlete, Val Young runs her a close second.

Sporting Spotlight

Cecil Devine

(1916 - 1990)

One of the legendary coach drivers in New Zealand in the 19th century was a Tasmanian called Devine.
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